On Election Day, Massachusetts voters decisively voted for a ballot referendum to require employers in the Commonwealth to allow employees to earn sick time. This citizen lead initiative bypassed years of frustration as similar legislation failed to garner enough support on Beacon Hill to become law. While this initiative is a huge step forward for Massachusetts employees, especially those working jobs that only pay minimum wage to just above minimum wage, there are still several unresolved issues. These issues will remain unresolved until Attorney General Elect Maura Healey takes office and has the opportunity to review the initiative and make recommendations on it. She will have time to do so as the new Earned Sick Time law does not go into effect in the Commonwealth until July 1, 2015. This blog post aims to provide a basic overview of what you, the employee, can expect to see under the new law.
Who does it apply to?
The common misconception of the new Earned Sick Time law is that it only applies to larger employers, employers with eleven or more employees. The law applies to all employers in Massachusetts, however, the requirements are different for employers with eleven or more employees.

The law takes into account full and part time, as well as temporary and seasonal, employees to reach the total number of employees. While the new law covers employees that work in both the private and public sectors, the law does exempt certain municipalities from following the new law. Nonetheless, these municipalities will be required to abide by the law if the state constitution requires it to, a local or state legislative vote makes the law applicable to the municipality, or the municipality appropriates sufficient funds to […]