Monthly Archives: April 2016

Can I Seal my Criminal Record in Massachusetts?

Can I Seal my Criminal Record in Massachusetts?

Are Criminal Charges Following You?
You have been in trouble with the law many years ago, but that criminal record has been following your around for years. Can you seal your criminal record? In Massachusetts it is possible to seal criminal charges on your record. If your criminal record has lead to difficulty in finding employment or housing you have the option to petition the courts or the Office of the Commissioner of Probation. Depending on the outcome of your criminal case you may need to only petition the court, however, in other circumstances you will need to petition the Office of the Commissioner of Probation. It is important to keep in mind that even a case that was dismissed or where you were found Not Guilty can still have an impact in your life when an employer, school, or housing official looks at your criminal record.
Hire an Attorney to Seal Records
Hiring an Attorney that can determine where you need to file your petition to seal, and what documentation needs to be submitted will help to significantly increase your chances of having your criminal record successfully sealed. If you petition the court, your Attorney can determine what court your petition needs to be filed in, and can represent you at the multiple hearings that take place before your petition can be allowed.
Experience Matters
At Cohen Cleary, P.C., we have experience in working with clients to seal records. Having a criminal record that is years old can still have a detrimental effect on your career, educational prospects, and can even prevent you from attending events with your child’s school. Hiring an attorney that knows the rules and procedures for sealing […]

By |April 22nd, 2016|Seal Record|0 Comments|

Retaliated Against for Making an OSHA Complaint?

Retaliated Against for Making an OSHA Complaint?
Have you ever been placed in an uncomfortable position by your employer due to their unlawful safety practices? Perhaps you made a complaint to your supervisor, the owner of company, or Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) office regarding these concerns. If your complaint contributed to, or was a motivating factor for your employer to take adverse employment actions against you, then you are protected from these retaliatory actions as you are deemed to be a “whistleblower.”

Common forms of retaliation include but are not limited: demotion; denying overtime or promotions; denying benefits; reduction in pay or hours; reassignment to a less desirable position; suspension; and termination. An employee has a very narrow window to submit a complaint for whistleblower retaliation (30 days) as such; if you have been subject to an adverse employment action by your employer it is important that you seek help and legal advice as soon as possible.

Filing a retaliation claim against an employer who retaliated against you for engaging in a protected activity is the first step to restoring your employment and being compensated for your lost wages. If you’re unsure of whether or not your complaint qualifies you for protection below is a list of the 10 most frequently cited workplace violations for 2015:

Fall Protection
Hazard Communication
Scaffolding
Respiratory Protection
Lockout/ Tagout
Powered Industrial Trucks
Ladders
Electrical – Wiring Methods
Machine Guarding;
Electrical – General Requirements

If you or someone you know has been a victim of retaliation for being a whistleblower, contact our office in Raynham or Plymouth, MA at (508) 880-6677 for a free consultation regarding your possible rights and remedies.

Authored by Attorney Eric Langfield, an associate at Cohen Cleary, P.C. in Southeastern Massachusetts.